October 26, 2008

Eat Your Cherries To Reduce Inflammation From High Blood Sugar


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Red tart cherries may help reduce inflammation and potentially decrease the risk of developing elevated blood sugar, researchers found. Loaded with antioxidants, cherries reduced inflammation markers by as much as 50 percent in this latest study. That’s important news for people who have diabetes or prediabetes because inflammation is a major pathway for dangerous interactions  More on Eat Your Cherries To Reduce Inflammation From High Blood Sugar


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October 12, 2008

New dLife.com Articles On Inflammation, Diabetes, Strong Teeth


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Lowering blood sugar by getting your teeth fixed and by keeping inflammation in check are the focus of my two new articles on dLife.com. It may seem counterintuitive to think that a normal blood sugar count and gum disease are related, but the fact is they’re so closely intertwined that once they start to interact they  More on New dLife.com Articles On Inflammation, Diabetes, Strong Teeth


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October 16, 2008

New Type Of Drug That Reduces Inflammation May Prevent Diabetes


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We’ve written volumes about inflammation and how it affects the interactions between gum disease and elevated blood sugar levels – just follow this link and you’ll find a mountain of our previous articles. Now, researchers have found that a new class of drugs that reduce inflammation could be a key to preventing diabetes as well as  More on New Type Of Drug That Reduces Inflammation May Prevent Diabetes


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November 29, 2008

Is Gum Inflammation Affecting Your Blood Sugar Levels?


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Inflammation in your mouth can affect how well you can manage elevated blood sugar. In addition to high blood sugar symptoms, it can also cause problems throughout your entire body.

To talk with a dentist who understands how to lower blood sugar, follow this link to find a DentistryForDiabeticsSM dentist in your area.


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July 11, 2008

Taking Control Of Your Health: Step Six (Continued) – Sleep Apnea And An Inflammation Link


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The last post on sleep apnea – for now, at least.   I’m spending so much time on it because it truly does pose risks for people who work hard to manage their diabetes symptoms and is also linked with dental health.

Another way gum disease plays into sleep apnea is associated with something called amyloidosis. This is a somewhat rare inflammatory disorder in which proteins called amyloids are abnormally deposited in various tissues. This buildup can cause serious changes.
 
Researchers have documented it as a cause of severe periodontal disease. The link with gum disease and sleep apnea involves the tongue. In amyloidosis, about 20 percent of people will develop an enlarged tongue. Not only can this interfere with speaking and swallowing. By posing an even larger airway obstruction during sleep, it can also cause sleep apnea.
 
Amyloidosis is a type of inflammatory disorder along the lines of rheumatoid arthritis. Some researchers believe the immune system and inflammation are key factors in both arthritis and gum disease. No one is ready to say that periodontal disease causes rheumatoid arthritis, but I think most medical and dental professionals would agree that the relationship between bacterial infection in the mouth and arthritis is definitely worth further study.
 
Did you know that there is a closed loop between your dental health and your ability to successfully manage your blood sugar? For more diabetes information, get your free five-lesson mini-course on diabetes and your teeth at DentistryForDiabetics.com.
 

 


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April 29, 2008

Gum Disease & The Inflammation Response: A Silent But Deadly Duo for People Who Have Diabetes


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The body’s inflammation response to emerging gum disease may not sound much like a significant health threat, but keep in mind that it may be going on without any obvious symptoms. You may see an increase in blood glucose as the oral bacteria increase your insulin resistance. You may also have periodontal disease without any symptoms at all.

So you may watch your blood glucose continue to rise, and go to your physician to check it out. Your doctor may not look for an oral connection and may be puzzled by not being able to nail down any other cause, but may adjust your insulin or oral medication in response so that your blood glucose remains in control. And you may think to yourself, “Well, I guess my diabetes is just getting worse.”
 
That’s true, it is getting worse. But in this case, there’s a very good reason for that, and it’s one that is readily treated. There is plenty of evidence in the scientific literature showing that treating gum disease can rapidly reverse rising blood glucose. One study found that people who have diabetes experienced a clinically significant improvement in their periodontal disease after basic non-surgical treatment. Just three months later, their diabetes symptoms had also improved and six months later they were still keeping it better controlled.
 
Another study showed that treatment to reduce the number of bacteria in the pockets that form around your teeth from gum disease also significantly improved control of diabetes. The researchers said this is probably due to reducing the inflammatory response, which also lowers your body’s insulin resistance, which means that your cells can successfully transfer glucose from your bloodstream so it can be used for energy. The net result is that the glucose transferred into tissue cells for energy is no longer in your bloodstream, so your blood sugar levels fall.
 
Other researchers confirmed a different effect of improved blood glucose levels, and said that controlling periodontal infections is an important part of the overall management of diabetes.
 
How much do you really know about managing your blood sugar level? Click here to take this interesting quiz from dLife.com.
 
For more diabetes information, get your free five-lesson mini-course on diabetes and your teeth at DentistryForDiabetics.com.

 


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April 28, 2008

Gum Disease & Diabetes: A Two-Way Street


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Researchers have documented connections that show diabetes and periodontal disease form a two-way street. Just as diabetes makes gum disease worse, gum disease affects how well people who have diabetes can control their blood glucose levels. One study showed that people who have diabetes and who also have severe periodontitis had a risk of worsening blood glucose control that was six times higher than people who have diabetes but who didn’t have gum disease. 

How can periodontal disease affect blood glucose levels? Research so far indicates that it’s related to the body’s inflammation response. It’s clear that both gum disease and diabetes – especially type 2 diabetes – are affected by inflammation. This includes inflammation caused by bacterial infection. In diabetes, bacterial infections that get into the system increase the body’s insulin resistance. The cells can’t use insulin to transfer glucose out of the blood so the sugar can be burned to provide energy to the cell. As a result, the sugar stays in the blood and raises the blood glucose level. 
 
The exact mechanism creates a circular process of effects that make each other worse. Periodontal diseases often increase blood levels of cells that promote inflammation. These cells are called proinflammatory cytokines. Cytokines are proteins that the body uses to interact or communicate between different types of cells.
 
People who have diabetes symptoms often have high blood concentrations of other cells that take promoting inflammation to an even greater level. These cells are called hyperinflammatory cytokines.
 
When those two types of inflammation-promoting cells interact due to gum disease in a person who has diabetes, the body responds by releasing even more of the proinflammatory cytokines. The net effect, again, compounds insulin resistance and makes it increasingly difficult to keep blood glucose levels under control and stable.
 
At the same time, all these additional cells that promote inflammation are also at work to make your gum disease worse. It’s like trying to extinguish a fire by dousing it with gasoline.
 
Click this link to read an article about some of the latest research into inflammation and diabetes.
 
For more diabetes information, get your free five-lesson mini-course on diabetes and your teeth at DentistryForDiabetics.com.

 


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June 12, 2008

What Your Dentist Should Do, #5: Stay Current With Research


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Your dentist should be committed to staying up to date on the latest research results on the connections between diabetes, oral infection and inflammation. It’s a commitment that not all practitioners may be willing to make.   That’s just one more reason for you to check out your DentistryForDiabeticsSM regional practitioner.

Research on inflammation abounds. Medical professionals are continually learning more and more about the effects of inflammation on the body and why symptoms of inflammation need to be carefully monitored and treated almost daily.
 
Gum disease is a source of inflammation that triggers the formation of C-reactive proteins. These proteins are the body’s “first alert” system for fighting the onset of inflammation. The goal of your dentist and your physician should be to help you avoid inflammation bouts that can trigger a series of health problems.   For your best health, the three of you need to be working together as a team.
 
As a person with diabetes you are twice as likely to develop gum disease, especially true if your diabetes symptoms aren’t under control. If you also have severe gum disease, you face a premature death rate that’s eight times higher than people with diabetes who don’t have periodontal disease. And if you suffer from both these problems, you are three times as likely to die of combined heart and kidney failure.   Gum disease can also be a predictor of end-stage kidney disease. And, once gum disease is established in your mouth, you may find it makes it more difficult to control your diabetes. It can also lead to increased blood vessel disease.
 
For more diabetes information, get your free report that includes 10 fascinating health, nutrition, exercise, eating plan tips and strategies at DentistryForDiabetics.com.
 

 


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May 1, 2008

C-Reactive Protein: Marker Or Menace?


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Physicians and dentists who pay close attention to the connections between gum disease and diabetes may run tests to measure your C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. It’s important for patients to understand the meaning of tests and their results, so here’s a little background.

CRP is a protein that is present in your blood plasma when your body senses inflammation. It’s used by doctors as an inflammation marker, a way to tell that even though you may not know it yet and it may not be visible, your body is fighting inflammation somewhere.
 
CRP is produced by the liver, but only under certain circumstances. In normal, healthy people CRP may not even show up in a blood test. But when the body starts fighting inflammation, it starts sending a variety of cytokines that carry different messages to cells in many locations. These messenger cells are sort of like the body’s Paul Revere, riding from place to place to wake up the militia and spring them into action.
 
One of these messengers heads directly to your liver, sounding the alarm about the inflammation and telling it to crank up its production line because the body needs C-reactive protein for some specific purpose. Interestingly enough, we don’t know all the details yet about exactly what that purpose is. Right now, what we do know is that CRP is pumped into the blood when the body experiences inflammation. Whether CRP has a more active role in fighting inflammation is something that researchers are still trying to discover. They’re also taking a long, hard look at whether CRP is something of a villain. It may, in fact, turn out be a bad guy that contributes to some major health problems.

Defeatdiabetes.org has an interesting article on recent research into CRP and its implications for diabetes symptoms. Click here to read it now.

Get your free five-lesson mini-course on diabetes and your teeth at DentistryForDiabetics.com.


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June 11, 2009

More Links Between Arthritis And Gum Disease, Important In Diabetes


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We reported within the last two weeks about researchers revealing that treating gum disease reduces symptoms of a severe type of rheumatoid arthritis that can interfere with exercise to help blood sugar levels. Now, scientists have discovered that more than half of all people who have rheumatoid arthritis also have gum disease. Not only that, More on More Links Between Arthritis And Gum Disease, Important In Diabetes


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